Submit an Article Become a Reviewer

About

Focus and Scope

JOAD publishes data papers, which do not contain research results but rather a concise description of a dataset, and where to find it. Papers will only be accepted for datasets that authors agree to make freely available in a public repository. This means that they have been deposited in a data repository under an open licence (such as a Creative Commons Zero licence), and are therefore freely available to anyone with an internet connection, anywhere in the world.

A data paper is a publication that is designed to make other researchers aware of data that is of potential use to them. As such it describes the methods used to create the dataset, its structure, its reuse potential, and a link to its location in a repository. It is important to note that a data paper does not replace a research article, but rather complements it. When mentioning the data behind a study, a research paper should reference the data paper for further details. The data paper similarly should contain references to any research papers associated with the dataset.

Any kind of archaeological data is acceptable, including for example: geophysical data; quantitative or qualitative data; images; notebooks; excavation data, software, etc.

Publication Frequency

This journal publishes continuously, with papers coming online as soon as they have passed peer review.


Open Access Policy

This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.


Archiving Policy

The journal’s publisher, Ubiquity Press, focuses on making content discoverable and accessible through indexing services. Content is also archived around the world to ensure long-term availability.

Ubiquity Press journals are indexed by the following services:

CrossRef, JISC KB+, SHERPA RoMEO, Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), EBSCOHost, and Google Scholar. In addition, all journals are available for harvesting via OAI-PMH.

To ensure permanency of all publications, this journal also utilises CLOCKSS, and LOCKSS archiving systems to create permanent archives for the purposes of preservation and restoration.

If Journal of Open Archaeology Data is not indexed by your preferred service, please let us know by emailing support@ubiquitypress.com or alternatively by making an indexing request directly with the service.


Advertisement Policy

The journal only displays advertisements that are of relevance to its scope and will be of interest to the readership (e.g. upcoming conferences). All advertising space is provided free of charge and the editor and publisher have the right to decline or withdraw adverts at any point.

If you wish to propose a potential advert then please contact the editorial team. All adverts are displayed in the right column of the journal and will need to fit a 120 pixel wide space. All advert images will have to be provided to the publisher.


FAQ

What kinds of data can I publish?

All kinds of data are welcome. We are particularly interested in data that may have reuse potential or which is required to validate your research. Many research outputs meet these requirements. For example:

  • GIS data and maps
  • image and video data
  • site plans and notebooks
  • quantitative and qualitative survey data
  • ethongraphic data (can be anonymised)
  • artefact illustrations and measurements
  • grey literature
  • remote sensing data
  • bioarchaeological data
  • etc.

What is a data paper?

A data paper is a publication that is designed to make other researchers aware of data that is of potential use to them. As such it describes the methods used to create the dataset, its structure, its reuse potential, and a link to its location in a repository. It is important to note that a data paper does not replace a research article, but rather complements it. When mentioning the data behind a study, a research paper should reference the data paper for further details. The data paper similarly should contain references to any research papers associated with the dataset.

How do I submit a data paper?

Please see our ‘how to submit a data paper’ page.

How does JOAD peer review work?

Please see our overview of the peer review process.

Which open license should I apply to my data?

We recommend the following licenses for open data:

All of the above licenses carry an obligation for anyone using the data to properly attribute it. The main differences are whether this is a social requirement (CC0 and PDDL) or a legal one (CC-BY and ODC-BY). The less restrictive your license, the greater the potential for reuse.

We do not recommend licenses that impose commercial or other restrictions on the use of data. Generally, such licenses can prevent use of data by charities and the media, and make the remixing of data from various international sources legally problematic. At the same time, why impose commercial restrictions on publicly funded data, such that the public themselves are not able to build profitable or sustainable solutions that utilise it? There are of course some situations in which data must have a more restrictive license (e.g. funder requirements), and the editorial team will consider these on a case-by-case basis.

Which repositories do you recommend for archaeology data?

Please see our list of recommended repositories for examples. Other repositories may be acceptable, provided they meet the criteria below. Please contact us if you would like to discuss adding a new repository to the recommended list.

What are the criteria for a repository to be accepted?

Data must be made available via a suitable repository. To meet our acceptance criteria, repositories must:

  • be suitable for the type of data involved
  • be sustainable (i.e. it must have funding and plans in place to ensure the long-term preservation of the data)
  • allow open licences
  • provide persistent identifiers (e.g. DOI, handle, ARC etc.)

What does ‘open’ mean?

The term ‘open’ in this context is well described by the Open Knowledge Foundation: “A piece of content or data is open if anyone is free to use, reuse, and redistribute it — subject only, at most, to the requirement to attribute and share-alike.”

What are the benefits of publishing data?

Allowing others to reuse your data leads to more efficient science, as well as new kinds of studies previously not possible that involve the combination of multiple data sources. At the same time open data can be reused by the wider public for a range of purposes including teaching, journalism and citizen science projects. These and other benefits are summarised in the diagram on our about page.

Making research outputs available for others to work with and build upon is part of the social contract of academia. Data papers mean that data you have released can be cited and that those citations can be tracked. This is not only an indirect measure of impact and therefore important for career progression, but it can also help you understand who is using the data, and lead to new collaborations.

Do I have to make my data open?

It is difficult to argue that the results of publicly funded research should not be made publicly available, and many funding bodies are increasing the degree to which they encourage open archiving. We believe that the benefits listed aboveare already a strong incentive to publish data openly, but there are some occasions (e.g. source material copyright issues, subject privacy concerns) where it may not be possible.

JOAD will however only publish data papers for datasets archived with open licenses. Datasets that need to be partially redacted for legal reasons will be considered by the editorial team on a case by case basis.

How do I cite data?

If you use data from a repository that has been released under an open license then you are obliged to cite it (even under a CC0 license). By citing the data paper you also reward the author for sharing their data, as these citations can be tracked as for any scholarly paper (unfortunately there is no system for tracking the data citations themselves yet, which is another reason that a data paper is so useful). You should therefore include a reference to the data paper describing the data, followed by a reference to the data in the repository itself. In order for this to work it is essential that the citations are in the references section of the article and include the DOIs (or any other identifier the repository might use), e.g.:

References

Bevan, A. and Conolly, J. (2012) Intensive Survey Data from Antikythera, Greece. Journal of Open Archaeology Data 1(1), DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/4f3bcb3f7f21d

Bevan, A. and Conolly, J. (2012) The Antikythera Survey Project [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] (http://dx.doi.org/10.5284/1012484)

Do I have to pay to publish in this journal?

If your paper is accepted for publication, you will be asked to pay an Article Publication Charge (APC) of £100 to cover publications costs. This fee can normally be sourced from your funder or institution, and we recommend approaching them about this at the time of submission.

You will be able to pay any amount from nothing to full charge, as we recognise that not all authors have access to funding, and we do not want fees to prevent the publication of worthy work. The editor and peer reviewers of the journal will not know what amount (if any) you have paid, and this will in no way influence whether your article is published or not.


Recommended Repositories

Recommended repositories

The following repositories meet our peer-review requirements and are recommended for the archiving of JOAD datasets. Please contact us if you would like to use another repository or recommend that we add it to our list.

International repositoriesNational repositoriesInstitutional repositories
JOAD Dataverse
Archaeology Data Service
Figshare
Open Context
tDAR
Zenodo
Arachne (Germany)
DANS (Netherlands)
Mappa (Italy)
SND (Sweden)
UCL Discovery

Locationhttp://thedata.harvard.edu/dvn/dv/JOAD
Focus and suitability Data can be uploaded to the JOAD Dataverse Repository designed specifically for papers in the Journal of Open Archaeology Data. We recommended this repository to authors because it is managed entirely by the JOAD editorial staff and ensures maximum interoperability between datasets and data papers.
CostFree for all JOAD authors.
LicensesCC0
Identifiers usedDOI
SustainabilityThe Dataverse Network is an open-source application funded by Harvard University.
Deposit instructions

Depositing data into the Dataverse is currently done manually:

  1. Go to the following link: http://thedata.harvard.edu/dvn/dv/JOAD and register for an account.
  2. Once logged in, create a new study and follow the instructions to deposit your data. Ensure that your data conforms to the JOAD peer review requirements
  3. You will receive a handle ID shortly after your submit your data. Please add this to the identifier field of your data paper.
  4. Once your paper has passed peer-review, the JOAD team will add the citation to your Dataverse entry. 

Locationhttp://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/
Focus and suitability Datasets concerning archaeology and the historic environment. Material is accepted from all over the world as long as it is in English (see scope of collections). The ADS provides specialised services for datasets requiring digitisation, conversion to other formats, or with customised display requirments. The ADS is the mandated repository for research projects funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Natural Environment Research Council. It is also a member of the Digital Preservation Coalition and was awarded the Data Seal of Approval in 2011.
Cost
  • Free for doctoral students
  • Free for grey literature reports attached to a completed OASIS record
  • Other data: Ingest and dissemination costs are by negotiation (e.g. provision of an online queriable database or GIS interface), plus storage and refreshment costs (see charging policy)
LicensesCC-BY (must be requested)
Identifiers usedDOI
SustainabilityThe Archaeology Data Service is funded by multiple higher education and government agencies including the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council and Natural Environment Research Council (see their funders page).
Deposit instructionsDepositing data associated with a JOAD data paper in the ADS is currently done manually:
  1. Contact the ADS to arrange your deposit (see their How to Deposit instructions).
  2. Check that your deposit also conforms to the JOAD peer review requirements.
  3. When the data has been made public on the ADS site, it will be assigned a DOI. Please enter this in your JOAD data paper under Repository Location.
  4. Once your JOAD paper has passed peer review and been published, please ask for this to be added as a reference to the ADS pages for your data.

Locationhttp://www.dans.knaw.nl/
Focus and suitability The DANS data archive collection contains datasets in the fields of humanities, archaeology, geospatial sciences and behavioural and social sciences. The archaeological collection comprises the e-Depot Nederlandse Archeologie, which accepts reports and datasets, either from Dutch archaeologists, or pertaining to Dutch archaeology.
CostFree
LicensesNo licence specified other than "open access". For more details please see DANS Conditions of Use on the reuse of deposited data.
Identifiers usedURN
SustainabilityDANs is funded by the Dutch government, and operates under the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) and the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).
Deposit instructionsDepositing data associated with a JOAD data paper in the DANS data archive is currently done manually:
  1. Go to DANS and follow the instructions for depositing archaeological data.
  2. Check that your deposit also conforms to the JOAD peer review requirements.
  3. When the data has been made public on the DANS site, it will be assigned a URN identifier. Please enter this in your JOAD data paper under Repository Location.
  4. Once your JOAD paper has passed peer review and been published, please add this to the description field on the DANS Research Project screen.

Locationhttp://figshare.com
Focus and suitability Figshare takes data from all subject areas, and is suitable for small to medium sized archaeological datasets that do not require specialised curation. '"Figshare allows you to share all of your data, negative results and unpublished figures."
CostFree. "Figshare gives users unlimited public space and 1GB of private storage space for free."
Licenses"All figures, media and multiple file uploads are published under a CC-BY license. All datasets are published under CC0."
Identifiers usedHandle
Sustainability"Figshare is an independent body that receives support from Digital Science. 'Digital Science's relationship with figshare represents the first of its kind in the company's history: a community- based, open science project that will retain its autonomy whilst receiving support from the division.'"
Deposit instructionsDepositing data associated with a JOAD data paper in Figshare is currently done manually:
  1. Create an account with figshare.
  2. Upload your data as either a fileset (most appropriate if you have multiple files) or a dataset.
  3. Check that your deposit also conforms to the JOAD peer review requirements.
  4. When the data has been made public on the figshare site, it will be assigned a handle identifier. Please enter this in your JOAD data paper under Repository Location.
  5. Once your JOAD paper has passed peer review and been published, please add the reference to the description field in figshare, and add the JOAD DOI to the links also.

Locationhttp://www.mappaproject.org/mod
Focus and suitability The MOD (MAPPA Open Data) archive contains datasets in the fields of archaeology and related disciplines. The archive accepts grey literature and datasets either from Italian archaeologists, or pertaining to Italian archaeology. Most data are from Italy but the archive accepts submissions from any location.
CostFree
LicensesCC-BY, CC0
Identifiers usedDOI
SustainabilityThe MOD is funded by University of Pisa and Regione Toscana, and operates in collaboration with MiBAC (Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities).
Deposit instructionsDepositing data associated with a JOAD data paper in Mappa is currently done manually:
  1. Contact MOD to arrange your data deposition
  2. Check that your deposit conforms to the JOAD peer review requirements.
  3. When the data has been made public on the MOD site, it will be assigned a DOI. Please enter this in your JOAD data paper under Repository Location.
  4. Once your JOAD paper has passed peer review and been published, please aask for the the reference to be added to the MOD page of your data.

Locationhttp://opencontext.org/
Focus and suitability Primary field research from archaeology and related disciplines. Most data is from US-based projects but the archive accepts submissions from any location.
Cost"Publication fees vary between $250 and $6000 depending on the complexity and size of the contributed database and related content." See Data Publication Guidelines for Contributors for details.
LicensesCC-BY, CC0
Identifiers usedARK
SustainabilityOpen Context is run by the Alexandria Archive Institute, a California-based 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, and has been funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.
Deposit instructionsDepositing data associated with a JOAD data paper in Open Context is currently done manually:
  1. Contact Open Context to arrange your deposit (see their guidelines).
  2. Check that your deposit also conforms to the JOAD peer review requirements.
  3. When the data has been made public on the Open Context site, you will be provided with a persistent weblink containing an ARK ID code. Please enter this in your JOAD data paper under Repository Location.
  4. Once your JOAD paper has passed peer review and been published, please add this as a reference in the Project/Collection Overview section in Open Context.

Locationhttp://snd.gu.se
Focus and suitability The Swedish National Data Service (SND) is a service organization for Swedish research within the humanities, social sciences, and health sciences. SND helps enable Swedish and international researchers gain access to existing digital data within and outside of Sweden.
CostFree
LicensesDetermined by submitter: CC0 and CC-BY accepted.
Identifiers usedDOI
SustainabilitySND is funded by the Swedish Research Council as a national center located at University of Gothenburg, and an important part of Sweden’s research infrastructure.
Deposit instructions

To deposit data associated with a JOAD paper in SND please follow these steps:

  1. Visit the following link: http://snd.gu.se/en/deposit-data/webform
  2. Upload your data using the web form and input relevant metadata.
  3. Check that your deposit also conforms to the JOAD peer review requirements.
  4. You will receive a confirmation e-mail, and will then be contacted by SND staff about possible metadata and documentation issues.
  5. Once your JOAD paper has passed peer review and been published, please add the DOI and citation to the SND metadata.

Locationhttp://www.tdar.org/
Focus and suitability tDAR is an international digital archive and repository that houses data about archaeological investigations, research, resources, and scholarship.
Costhttp://www.tdar.org/about/pricing/
LicensesCreative Commons by Attribution, unless otherwise specified
Identifiers usedDOI
SustainabilitytDAR's use, development, and maintenance are governed by Digital Antiquity, an organization dedicated to ensuring the long-term preservation of irreplaceable archaeological data and to broadening access to these data. Digital Antiquity's key objectives include fostering the use of tDAR and ensuring its financial, technical, and professional sustainability.
Deposit instructionsDepositing data associated with a JOAD data paper in tDAR is currently done manually:
  1. Go to tDAR and follow the instructions for creating or editing a dataset.
  2. Check that your deposit also conforms to the JOAD peer review requirements.
  3. When the data has been made public on the tDAR site, it will be assigned a permanent identifier. Please enter this in your JOAD data paper under Repository Location.
  4. Once your JOAD paper has passed peer review and been published, please add this into the Resource Notes section in tDAR.

Locationhttp://eprints.ucl.ac.uk/
Focus and suitabilityUCL Discovery showcases UCL's research outputs, giving access to journal articles, book chapters, conference proceedings, digital web resources, theses, datasets, software and much more, from all UCL disciplines. The repository also enables UCL researchers to comply with research funder policies on open access.
CostFree to UCL researchers.
LicensesAll open licences permitted
Identifiers usedDOI
SustainabilityUCL Discovery is maintained by UCL, a major international research institution ranked seventh in the world's top ten universities by the QS World University Rankings (2011).
Deposit instructionsDepositing data associated with a JOAD data paper in UCL Discovery is currently done manually:
  1. Log in to the UCL RPS system.
  2. Follow the general guide to depositing, with the following modifications:
  3. Expand the publications window so that it includes software, and click 'Add new'.
  4. If your software consists of more than one file, please compress these into one zip file and upload this.
  5. Place your licence information in the Notes section. Example text: "This software is licensed under a GNU General Public License (GPL)."
  6. Check that your deposit also conforms to the JOAD peer review requirements.
  7. When your software has been made public on the UCL discovery site, notify the JOAD editor and you will receive a DOI. Please enter this in the DOI field.
  8. Once your JOAD paper has passed peer review and been published, please enter the reference for it into the Notes section in UCL Discovery (e.g. 'This software is described in the following software paper: …').

Locationhttps://zenodo.org/
Focus and suitability ZENODO welcomes all research outputs from all fields of science in any format and size. ZENODO is furthermore integrated into reporting lines for research funded by the European Commission via OpenAIRE. Ubiquity Press therefore recoommends this repository for data funded by the European Commission.
CostFree
LicensesAny appropriate license accepted including CC0, Open Data Commons Licence, Open Government Licence.
Identifiers usedDOI
SustainabilityZENODO is developed and operated by CERN under the EU-funded OpenAIREplus project in synergy with other large services running on the same software such as CERN Document Server and INSPIRE-HEP. All uploads are stored in the same cloud infrastructure as research data from CERN's Large Hadron Collider. The entire platform is further more fully open - metadata is licensed under CC0, it's source code is licensed under GNU GPL and ZENODO furthermore allows harvesting of the entire repository by external sources.
Deposit instructions

To deposit data associated with a JOAD paper in ZENODO please follow these steps:

  1. Create an account with ZENODO.
  2. Upload your data and edit metadata such as title, description, authors.
  3. Check that your deposit also conforms to the JOAD peer review requirements.
  4. The data will go public immediately after submission and is instantly assigned a Digital Object Identifier. Please enter this in your JOAD software paper under Repository Location.
  5. Once your JOAD paper has passed peer review and been published, please add the DOI and citation to the ZENODO Related Identifiers field.

Quick links